The Best and Worst of Oscars 2018

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Oscars 2018

Oscars 2018

Here’s a look at the most memorable moments — for better or for worse — at the Oscars on Sunday, starting with Tiffany Haddish and Maya Rudolph stealing the show.

The Presenters Who Should Be Promoted to Hosts

Tiffany Haddish and Maya Rudolph were by far the funniest presenters of the night, complaining about painful high heels and complimenting each other’s bathroom-emergency scenes in “Girls Trip” and “Bridesmaids.” Other presenters were either forgettably banal or chillingly awkward (sorry, “Star Wars” people), so the duo of Ms. Haddish and Ms. Rudolph was an even more welcome presence. Could there be a hosting gig in their future? — Margaret Lyons

The Host Who Should Quit When He’s Ahead

The Oscars are infamous for bloat, so why add to that with onerous gags? Last year, Jimmy Kimmel dragged people who thought they were on a star tour into the Dolby Theater; this year, he interrupted a screening of “A Wrinkle in Time” at a nearby multiplex to have celebrities distribute snacks. It’s not funny, it doesn’t add anything, and when winners’ speeches are cut short to make room for bits like this, one can’t help but wonder why. Mr. Kimmel’s monologue was fine, but between this and the done-to-absolute-death “feud” with Matt Damon, he wound up in the red for the night. — Margaret Lyons

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Even with her mention of an “inclusion rider,” a technical proposal that would make diversity a provision of Hollywood contracts, Frances McDormand delivered a rousing speech, building to the point when she asked every female nominee in the room to stand. They did, and it was easily the most powerful moment of the night. — Margaret Lyons

The Most Rousing Feminist Moment

Even with her mention of an “inclusion rider,” a technical proposal that would make diversity a provision of Hollywood contracts, Frances McDormand delivered a rousing speech, building to the point when she asked every female nominee in the room to stand. They did, and it was easily the most powerful moment of the night. — Margaret Lyons

The Most Popular Long Shot

He’s written viral sketch comedy and was a co-writer of a movie with a cute cat named Keanu. Next stop, the Oscars? It felt like a long shot that Jordan Peele might end up onstage at the Dolby Theater on Sunday (even if others in the business were predicting it). And it felt like a stretch that academy members might recognize a horror film when they usually shy away from honoring them.

But there Mr. Peele stood, accepting the original screenplay statue for “Get Out.” He wasn’t sure it was possible to get there, either. “I stopped writing this movie about 20 times because I thought it was impossible,” he told the audience. “I thought no one would ever make this movie, but I kept coming back to it because I knew if someone let me make this movie, that people would hear it and people would see it.”

Boy did they. The film earned more than $255 million worldwide, along with critical raves and industry awards that put it at the center of a cultural moment. — Mekado Murphy

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SOURCE: (NY Times)