Wounded Warrior Project Gives Veterans Volunteer Opportunity

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America’s warriors have demonstrated time and time again that they are givers. Their sacrifices while serving in the military are proof of this, but it was also apparent at a recent Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) function at Habitat ReStore.

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A group of injured veterans gathered to take on various duties at the store, a nonprofit home improvement and donation center that is part of Habitat for Humanity. It sells new and gently used furniture, appliances, home accessories, and building materials. Warriors assisted in assorted positions, which included coordinating donations, organizing stock, and assisting customers.

 

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“The opportunity to serve others in the community was my favorite part,” said Dwayne Garrett, a wounded warrior in the Army Reserve. “All of the hours that we volunteered during this program went toward a veteran who is buying a home through the Habitat for Humanity Veterans Initiative.”

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WWP works hard to ensure that its programs bring back a sense of fellowship and a spirit of unity to injured service members. It is common for returning veterans to struggle with isolation when returning to civilian life after serving their country. It can be difficult to overcome that challenge and rekindle strong bonds similar to what these warriors formed in the military.

“I enjoy volunteering my time and meeting other wounded warriors through Wounded Warrior Project programs,” said Army veteran Ida Shavers. “These gatherings are always memorable due to the connections we create while helping each other and the community.”

 

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During the volunteer opportunity, warriors learned about other WWP programs that can help them overcome isolation, along with addressing educational and employment goals, and physical, mental, and emotional recovery. Thanks to generous donors, these programs are free for a lifetime; the injured veterans WWP serves have already paid their dues on the battlefield.

“I volunteer every month for this program to bond with service members and to share information about other Wounded Warrior Project opportunities,” Dwayne said. “It feels good to know other veterans still have the heart to serve.”